Author Topic: Back to the Peninsular Wars, events in Portugal and beyond  (Read 135948 times)

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Offline Lt. Campers

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July's the month of the Hussars

As mentioned before July's the month when the Hussars take to the field, when NATO
deploys her International Hussar patrol from the JALLC Base in Lisbon, on a long range
mission across Napoleonic Europe to reach Budapest, Hungary by October.
Of course those expats who read my last post, would already be aware that the
Poles are celebratiing the Year of the Hussar with the arrival of the Polish
Winged Hussars at the Battle of Kluszyn 1610, fought near Warsaw last weekend.
This turned out to be the largest gathering of Winged Hussars for a 17th century
battle re-enactment.
Their impact on the battlefield was to prove to be decisive in many campaigns fought
across Eastern & Central Europe during the 17th & 18th century. With the most notable
adaptation being the fierce, daring but flamboyant Hungarian Hussars that were copied
by many european armies of the Napoleonic Wars.

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Promotional video's for the Battle of Kluszyn 1610 - 2010

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Film of the Polish Winged Hussars at last weekends Battle of Kluszyn

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« Last Edit: 10:51 09-Aug-2010 by Lt. Campers »
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Offline ECOCKS

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Stirring!
Lots of mis-information here. Research carefully and decide what is real and what isn't.

Offline Lt. Campers

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Yes stirring stuff indeed - heres some film clips from the movie 1612
which is based on events during the Russo - Polish War of 1605 to 1618.

Siege during the Russo - Polish War from the film 1612

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Another video from last weekends re-enactment of the Battle of Kluszyn
near Warsaw


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« Last Edit: 21:34 28-Oct-2012 by Lt. Campers »
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Re: The Hungarian hussar patrol begins
« Reply #93 on: 21:12 16-Jul-2010 »


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The Hungarian hussar patrol begins

On the 9th July 1810 the Spanish border garrison of Ciudad Rodrigo surrendered
to the French under Ney. After a month long siege that lasted longer than
expected, leaving Napoleon's troops short of powder and shot; to continue to
their next objective, the Portuguese border fortress of Almeida.
Therefore the french had to await the arrival of their supply wagons, that are
now being heavily escorted by troops, to deter the Partisan's from harrasing their
supply columns.
The action's of the French and the partisan's are also making it extremely difficult
to travel along the highway's and byways of Spain without an armed escort. Therefore
on thursday 15th July the streets of Lisbon resounded once more to the clatter of
horseshoes, as the Hungarian hussar patrol sallied forth into the Portuguese
countryside. On a reconnaisance mission deep behind the spanish border.

This was the start of a daring 85 day mission to ride 3500 kilometers deep inside
Napoleonic Europe, to epitomise the spirit of the Austro-Hungarian hussars in their
defiance over the French and to attend various sites associated with the conflict.



Lieutenant Colonel Adam Barnabas, commanding the Hungarian raid said his
men will be visiting the barracks of all functioning cavalry regiments
in Portugal, Spain, France, Italy, Slovenia and Hungary during their
3 month mission. With particular emphasis on the Peninsular Wars currently
being refought on the Spanish Peninsular.

On patrol with the Hungarian hussars - read the everyday
dispatches from a trooper in the hussars as he rides across
the Iberian Peninsular


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Latest news is that the hussar patrol continues to move forward beyond the
Torres Vedras lines after visiting Mafra. Throughout the mission, the hussars
will be practising various reconnaisence methods used in the past and
hope to call upon the assistance of locals in providing food and forage.

Hungarian hussar cantering through a Portuguese village



Hungarian officer approaches the village of Golega, seeking billets
for his men


« Last Edit: 21:35 28-Oct-2012 by Lt. Campers »
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Offline Lt. Campers

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Re: Patrol beats a hasty retreat near Mafra
« Reply #94 on: 21:27 17-Jul-2010 »
Hussars beat a hasty retreat near Mafra

Less than 48 hours into their mission, the hungarian hussars had to
make a quick detour from their planned route. Not as you would assume,
by the approach of french dragoons intent on intercepting the patrol.
But by the approach of some wild Portuguese stallion's who
suddenly took a fancy to the Patrol's mares and gave chase.  :D  ;)

As the hussars beat a hasty retreat, one of the troopers damaged
his sword during the ensuing flight and it took some time for the
troopers to resume their composure before continuing their mission.
« Last Edit: 21:43 28-Oct-2012 by Lt. Campers »
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Following his retreat from Fort Conception in Spain, Craufords Light Division
numbering 4,200 infantry and 800 cavalry, takes up position facing the French,
with his left flank resting on the fortress of Almeida while his right flank is
secured by the unfordable river Coa.
Wellington upon hearing of the French advance, asks Crauford to fall back
across the river Coa but Crauford instead chooses to make his stand by the
fortress of Almeida.

The third invasion begins, Portuguese press report on Massena's army crossing
into Portugal, following the siege of Ciudad Rodrigo


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French infantry crossing the border



Loison's division come under cannon fire



Combat on the Coa, the french attack

So it was that during the early hours of 24th July, that Ney sent forward two french
divisions commanded by Major Generals Mermet and Loison backed by cavalry
 against Craufords troops. Opposing them over a 3 kilometer front
are 5 battalions of the 43rd foot, the 1st & 3rd Portuguese Cacadores and
elements of the 52nd regiment supported by the 95th Rifles.
Shortly after daybreak Craufords 5 battalions come under determined attack
from 13 battalions of Loisons division but no sooner had this first attack been
checked by intense musketry and rifle fire from Craufords men, than several
hundred troopers of the 3rd Hussars charged into Craufords left flank,
practically annihilating a company of chosen men from the 95th Rifles.

With his line in danger of being rolled up by the French attack from the left,
Crauford orders an immediate retreat to the bridge over the Coa; while
3 battalions of british troops strived to hold back the French, the retreat was
badly delayed by an overturned wagon which necessitates abandoning some
of Crauford's guns to the French.
Nevertheless thanks to resolution of his rear guard, Craufords men make
it safely across the Coa.

French hussars charge through Crauford's left flank



Having secured their side of the river, the French are in a strong position to
complete their encirclement of Almeida. But Ney, not content with seeing
off the british, is determined to give chase and embarks on a costly attack
on the bridge over the Coa.
Here Craufords troops stand their ground and as Ney sends his best men
forward to clear the bridge, each of the three assaults by Grenadiers and his
elite Chasseurs de la Siege are beaten off with heavy casualties.

The battle ends with both sides licking their wounds and although Ney fails
to encircle and completely defeat Craufords Light Division, he has nevertheless
won the battle by securing the ground needed for Massena to commence
the siege of Almeida.
Meanwhile Crauford continues his withdraw from Almeida after midnight,
completely unmolested by the french.

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Account of the Combat on the Coa, from Harry Smith of the 95th diaries

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Radio Fronteira - Combat on the Coa

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Combat on the Coa - 200 anniversary events

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Almeida besieged - Siege of Almeida events

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Latest dispatch from the Hungarian Hussars

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« Last Edit: 21:44 28-Oct-2012 by Lt. Campers »
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Enemy at the Gate - the french at Almeida

Following the defeat of Craufords light division at the Combat on the Coa, the
Portuguese border fortress of Almeida finds herself surrounded by the troops of
Marshals Ney and Massena.
As the French establish camp beyond the city walls, the troops dig in for what
could be a long siege. Almeida is a well designed 18th century star shaped fortress.
Almost perfectly circular and protected by six bastions, its escarpments are armed
with 100 guns and a garrison of 4000 infantry, 400 gunners with a squadron of
cavalry, all entrusted to the command of Colonel William Cox, an officer of the
British army in command of the Portuguese garrison.
Wellington has high hopes of Almeida surviving a siege for at least of month and
ensured the town and its garrison was well stocked with food and ammunition.

With Almeida completely surrounded and sealed off, Massena entrusts the conduct
of the siege to Marshall Neys VI Corps and Ney wastes no time in sending an
emissary to the gates of Almeida demanding her surrender. Cox politely refuses
to surrender and thus the French settle down in their camps, to wait the arrival
of their heavy siege guns, still enroute from Ciudad Rodrigo.

As the town and garrison of Almeida adjusts to life under siege. Portuguese
reporters are sent to gauge the mood of the troops and its defiant Mayor,
who?s expecting a long and difficult siege but is still welcoming any visitors
brave enough to break through the french lines, to see the many events and
exhibitions being held in Ameida.

Local Portuguese news report from Almeida

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« Last Edit: 21:45 28-Oct-2012 by Lt. Campers »
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The french make a surprise attack

Following Neys victory on the Coa, a company of british soldiers find
themselves stranded on the wrong side of the river.
Cut off during the retreat, they seek refuge down one of the many gulleys
that punctuate the river valley, here they remain until the fighting is over
before sending a man out the following morning.
Daybreak reveals that Crauford and his men have gone, leaving the French
in total control of the Coa valley.
A quick reconnoitre of the bridge finds it barricaded and guarded by
Neys troops.
With the river Coa treacherous and in flood the british have to make a
tough decision, being encumbered with wounded soldiers, the officer resolves
to move towards Almeida and hopefully ( under cover of darkness )
break through the French patrols to the city gates where they will
seek refuge within the garrison.

French hussars patrolling the approach roads to Almeida



Unknown to the british a party of French voltiguers, stumble across their
position and are about to take them prisoner, when their officer
warns them off. As the british are completely unaware of their presence,
he asks his men to keep an eye on them while he reports back to his superiors.

The French officer sees the stranded soldiers as an opportunity and as his
Voltiguers say they are moving towards the fortress, it becomes clear
they are hoping to take refuge in Almeida.
The officer approaches Ney with his plans which are simply to gather a picked
force of men to tail the british, as they approach Almeida and then rush the
gates, just as the Portuguese open them; to let the british soldiers through.
Stealth is important and with night approaching Neys officers have picked
the best troops for the task, namely Voltiguers and Chasseurs a Cheval.

As night falls, the bedraggled british troops are completely unaware that the
French are following them and as they approach Almeida, they cannot believe
their luck as they find so few French sentries blocking their path.

The officer runs across the bridge to summon the guard, a few questions are
asked before the officer of the watch signals his men to open the gate.
While the british make their way through the entrance with the wounded,
the French storm the gate overpowering the Portuguese sentries and
signalling for others to follow them.

The british fire a few shots before taking cover - at this point the alarm
is raised, as more shots ring out and theirs a flurry of activity as the
garrison is called to arms.
The officer commanding the raid knows that time is the essence, as his
men secure the gate, his troops rush forward, aided by a sketch of
the town supplied by a French spy.

The french officer is under orders to secure the governors residence and
with it Colonel Cox and hopefully the towns mayor as well.
As more French troops secure the gate, portuguese reporters are on hand
to capture the scene on video, as the fighting moves on through
the streets of Almeida.
Fortunately the french are beaten off before they reach their objective and
the fortress gates secured. But it was touch and go whether the french
would succeed or not.

The french storm Almeida

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« Last Edit: 21:47 28-Oct-2012 by Lt. Campers »
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Above shows a Portuguese sentry patrolling the Lines of Torres Vedras

Almeida awaits relief as the French dig in for a long Siege

As the french tighten their grip around Almeida, their seems to be little
hope for the garrison, as Ney waits patiently for the arrival of his heavy
siege guns ( still bogged down ) on the abysmal roads, leading
from Ciudad Rodrigo to the portuguese border.

Wellington is also waiting patiently for more troops to arrive from
England and in particular the renowned riflemen of the 95th Rifles,
scheduled to land in Portugal by the 25th August.
Led by its redoubtable Commanding Officer Chumley, the peer is
expecting great things of the 95th and any other british troops
he can muster for the British relief column to Almeida.

Again were priviledged to get this revealing insight into the
calibre of the 95th's esteemed commander


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« Last Edit: 21:49 28-Oct-2012 by Lt. Campers »
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Hussars head into Spain today

Those expats who have been reading the latest dispatches from the
Hungarian hussars, will know that our gallant hussars crossed into
Spain today.
So far the patrol has continued almost without incident, other than
a few forest and brush fires that have forced them to veer from
their intended route. But overall they are pressing ahead with the
mission as planned.

Last weekend, the french governor of Salamanca received word of
the approaching hussars and detailed a number of french troops
to intercept them on the roads to Salamanca.
Therefore the French patrols were very much in evidence as they
scoured the spanish roads and byways leading to Salamanca.







French officer leading the patrol



French troops scour a spanish village seeking news of the hussars







Many villagers leave no doubt where their sympathies lie




Suffice to say the French were working on false intelligence, as the hussars
had yet to cross into Spain.
« Last Edit: 21:59 29-Jul-2010 by Lt. Campers »
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Hussars receive a warm welcome in Canizal

Regular readers of the Hungarian hussar dispatches, will be pleased to
know our troopers passed by Salamanca without incident and camped
overnight at the village of Canizal before continuing their journey
onto Valladolid.
Only the other weekend Canizal found herself at the centre of a
vigourous route march by the French, as infantry and cavalry combed the
area, hoping to engage any british troops or hussars sent by Wellington.
Campers has already been mentioned in dispatches, for keeping the
Mayor of Canizal informed of the imminent arrival of the Hungarian patrol.
Word of the hussars arrival soon spread quickly round the village,
that the hussars can be found encamped on a nearby sports field.

See latest entry in the Hussar patrol dispatches

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Hussars tends to their horses - as they take a break from the patrol

« Last Edit: 22:40 11-Sep-2010 by Lt. Campers »
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Siege of Almeida weekend 27th to 30th August




As expats know British troops are scheduled to march on Almeida on
the 25th August in a bid to relieve the Portuguese garrison over the
bank holiday weekend of the 27th to 30th August.
In attendance ( BAA strikes permitting ) will be the 44th East Essex
Regiment of Foot backed up by chosen men from the 95th Rifles.
A full weekend of events are planned where visitors will be able
to visit the British and Portuguese camps in Almeida. Together with
the french encampment pitched beyond the fortress walls as Ney &
Massena's men await the arrival of heavy siege guns, with
which to breach the city walls.

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French troops block all roads in and out of Almeida

« Last Edit: 21:14 31-Aug-2010 by Lt. Campers »
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Back to the Hussar Patrol

Following the start of the Siege of Almeida, its been hard to keep track of
all thats happening on the Spanish Peninsular. The gaps in my reports have
led to rumours on the forum of my untimely demise. Suffice to say such
rumours are false, as I continue to report from behind enemy lines.
Anyway preperations for the march on Almeida continue, as following a military
display and training session last weekend. Both the 44th East Essex and
95th Rifles are ready to embark for Portugal ( a situation undoubtedly helped
by the BAA strike being called off )

Obviously such news was met with consternation from the french, who
promise to give the British a warm reception when they arrive at Almeida.  :o

NATO's Hungarian Hussars form up with a Spanish regiment



In the meantime - how goes the NATO Hussar patrol, you might ask.
Well the Hungarians have done well, not only evading french
troops that scoured the countryside around Salamanca but also
to ride on beyond the Pyrennes into France !!!
Not only have they encountered a number of Spanish regiments
on their patrol but have also been welcomed  in many
spanish towns and villages along the way.

The Hungarians during the days of the Austro-Hungarian empire, have
been defying Napoleon for years, as can be seen in the document
below. Many photos including that of the Hungarian Hussar patrol
on parade, can be found on page 33.

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The gallant Lieut. Colonel of the Patrol, has been sending back official
reports to NATO which you can browse on the link below.
Its in all in Hungarian of course but I'm sure expats will have no problem
translating them, if only they can find a good online translator.

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« Last Edit: 10:43 20-Aug-2010 by Lt. Campers »
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Spies in Uniform - Espionage on the Spanish Peninsular

With the french surrounding Almeida and a multitude of Napoleon's forces
operating in Spain. Wellington would soon have to rely on a new team
of Exploring officers to venture out behind enemy lines, to bring back
what ever information they can glean of the french troops ranged
against him.

As Wellington himself would say:
All the business of war and indeed all the business of life, is to endeavor
to find out what you don't know by what you do: that's what I call 'guessing
what was on the other side of the hill.
'  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

At the turn of the 19th century, British military intelligence was all but non-existent.
It was considered beneath the dignity of an officer to engage in the rather shady
business of spying, which before this time had been the occupation of rather
nefarious characters and people willing to sell out their mother country.

But with the growing threat of Napoleon's power in Europe and the very real
idea of war with France, General Brownrigg, the Quartermaster-General of the
British Army, went to the Commander in Chief, Frederick, the Duke of York,
with a proposal for the army to develop a unit to be known as the Depot of
Military Intelligence. He had a very good example from which to draw on:
Napoleon's own highly successful Bureau d'Intellingence.

While Brownrigg's Depot of Military Intelligence seems essential in hindsight,
at the time it was viewed with a skeptical eye. He had a hard time recruiting
competent officers when promotion and renown was won on the battlefield,
not behind a desk in London.
Every capable officer posted to the Depot wasted no time in seeing himself
posted elsewhere, so that the intelligence and skill of the remaining staff
was deplorably low.

As an example of how limited the spread of information was within the Army.
When General Wellesley arrived in Portugal, he was unable to lay hands
on an accurate map of the country. The only remedy to this problem ?
He wrote to his brother-in-law to send him one purchased with his own
funds because the Army was unable to provide this elementary necessity.

Up until the end of 1810, Wellington had to to rely on scouts and
armed patrols ( typified by the Hungarian Hussar Patrol ) to glean
whatever information can be found, behind enemy lines. But the
scouts proved unreliable and the armed patrols too costly in terms
of men and resources.

Wellington forms a Corps of Exploring Officers

Faced with a lack of information about his enemy, as well as the terrain
and countryside, Wellington wasted no time in being able to answer
such a simple question as "what is over the next hill," by starting a
corps of "Exploring Officers." Wellington recruited men who shared
three distinct skills: they were fine horsemen, skilled linguists, and able
to express themselves in writing or sketching in the briefest and
most concise terms.

One of the first duties in the winter of 1810 when the fighting was at a low
ebb, was for the Exploring Officers to map every bit of the Portuguese
countryside four miles to the inch. This they accomplished with the aid of
local inhabitants who knew their own immediate area but had often never
traveled beyond the sight of their villages or farms.

With the countryside mapped, the next duty of exploring officers was to
be sent out on reconnaissance, moving behind enemy lines, learning troop
movements and strategic information & return this news to Wellington
in a timely manner.

John Waters of the Royal Scots was known as a wily and capable man
behind enemy lines. Despite his skill and stealth, he was caught by the
French and given up for dead by his regiment.
When Wellington was told about his capture and probable execution, he
delayed the usual splitting up of a lost soldier's personal possessions,
saying that "Waters would be back and would want his things."
Wellington was right, for Waters eventually returned.

Considering that a soldier or officer caught behind enemy lines out of
uniform was immediately shot as a "spy," most of the exploring officers
wore their uniforms while they went about their jobs.
However, John Grant was one of the few officers who considered himself
a spy and went about in disguise. He identified very closely with the
Portuguese people and adopted local dress, much to the horror of his
fellow officers.

It would seem that these daring men, who took such great risks to aid their
fellow soldiers, would have been lauded after the war, but unfortunately
they were shunned by their regiments and in some cases not welcomed back
at all. They were regarded by officers of their former regiments to which they
belong as having been "gading about" while the real business of war
was being fought at the walls of Badajoz or on the fields of Salamanca.
At least history has been kinder to these heroes and their exploits and
feats of skill and daring are now part of the annals of British history
as the founding members of Britain's military intelligence service.

The activities of Wellington's exploring officers during the Peninsular Wars,
are the stuff of legends, with lone British Officers on fast mounts, scurring
across the Spanish Peninsular to spy on french troops, bases and depots,
often liaising with partisans who would pass on any captured dispatches.
Of course their activities became well known to the french who would
leave no stone unturned in giving chase and tracking down these Officers.

Upon capture, their was little the french could do to punish them as
being in uniform and whatsmore fully commisioned Officers as well.
They were entitled to the same generous courtesies bestowed on
any Officers captured during the Napoleonic Wars.
Namely to be treated as 'prisoner officer guests' upon 'giving their parole'
either to be held until the next Officer exchange or else returned to
France, to be confined to one of the numourous 'Parole Towns' just
like the ones set up in England.

Exploring Officers of the 20th Century

I'm sure many expats would be surprised at the idea of British Officers in
full uniform "gading about" the Spanish Peninsular, playing a cat & mouse
game with the french dragoons, out to catch them. Only to end up with
nothing more than a slap on the wrist if caught.
A throw back to the age of chivalry perhaps and officers being treated like
gentlemen  & the knights of old, as opposed to the other ranks of course.
Nothing like that happens in modern times unless covered by the Geneva
convention.
Well your wrong - something like that has been happening in fairly
recent times, namely throughout the Cold War. The location
being the Warsaw Pact training grounds and Soviet Army build up
points in East Germany, behind the infamous Iron Curtain. If the Cold
War ever turned hot, this was where World War III would start.

Spies in Uniform - The Military Liaison Missions in Germany

Here Wellington's desire to find out whats going on over the other
side of the hill are replaced by Churchill & many Cold War leaders
desire to know whats going on behind the Iron Curtain.

The Allied powers liaison missions were a consequence of the occupation
of Germany at the  end of the Second World War. When all four occupying
powers needed representatives in rival camps. Therefore the British, French,
American & Soviet forces established liaison missions in each others zone
of occupation.
The British Military Liaison Mission was called BRIXMIS, meaning The British
Commanders in Chief Mission to the Soviet Forces in Germany.

With the start of the Cold War and the establishment of the East and West
German states, the three western allied missions in the Soviet occupation
zone ( that became East Germany ) found themselves serving 'behind the
iron curtain' But the liaison missions between the Soviet forces in
the east and the western allied forces in the west ( now all part of NATO )
continued as before but with roving patrols of a clandestine nature.
All to gather intelligence of any new Soviet and Warsaw Pact tanks,
planes, missiles and any other military hardware that would be of
interest to western intelligence agencies.

The skills required for Wellington's Exploring Officers are still of value
to the British, French & American Liaison missions, namely they should
be skilled linguists and able to express themselves in writing or
sketching in the briefest and most concise terms.
Ok skilled horsemanship has been dropped from the list to be replaced
by 'skilled drivers' namely the ability to drive and swerve themselves out
of danger when pursued by the Stasi & military police of the Soviet and
East German armies.
What we term nowadays as defensive driving.

The Military Liaison Missions

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The BRIXMIS Mission

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Listen again to The Brixmis Story, recording of Radio 4 program
The Brixmis Story, still available on the internet. Copy the link below
and paste it into the http field at the top of your browser. A file
download window will appear, choose Open - it will open up a
media player window  where you can listen to The Brixmis Story again.


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This brings me nicely onto the highlight of this weeks entertainment
on the Military Channel ( Sky 531 in the UK ) namely ................

Secrets of the Cold War - Spy Stories, The Potsdam Mission - on
UK Military History channel, thurs August 26th at 8pm


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Whats this ? - you want more Real life Spy Stories

In response to many requests for more stories on the Military
Liaison missions in East Germany. Mainly from expats who couldn't
couldn't tune into Spy Stories, The Potsdam Mission ( which was
an edited version of the Keeping the Cold War, Cold film )

The American version of Brixmis, namely the United States Military
Liaison Mission to Group of Soviet Forces, Germany. Operated alongside
the British & French liaison missions in Potsdam, East Germany.
Unclassified annual reports on USMLM tours of East Germany are now
in the public domain.

The introductory section or 'foreward' to these annual reports leave
no doubt as to what USMLM was really up to 'besides the rather
mundane role of military liaison work'

Primary:  To conduct liaison between CinC US Army Europe and CinC
group of Soviet forces Germany.

Secondary: To exploit the USMLM status and potential for the collection
of intelligence information in East Germany,

Absolutely Riveting reports

As you would expect these are riveting blow by blow accounts
of the 'cat & mouse game' played out by US tour officers, NCO's
and their drivers, as they take photos and monitor troop movements
inside East Germany ( the former DDR ) from 1964 to 1988.

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UK leaving the best until last

Of course it goes without saying that the UK remain rather reticent
in coming forward with their annual reports on Brixmis. But you know
we always leave the best till last.

Derring do

Nevertheless when it comes to tales of 'derring do' Wellington's
Exploring Officers must rank highly amoungst other legendary characters
such as Biggles.
« Last Edit: 21:50 28-Oct-2012 by Lt. Campers »
The first in the field and the last from the Taverna.

Offline Lt. Campers

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Back to the Hungarian Hussars, in France

With the British relief column expected to land in Portugal any day now. Their
was great jubilation over the weekend in Lisbon as Wellington's headquarters
along with JALLC in Monsanto, celebrated a milestone in the Hussar patrol's
raid across Southern Europe. Namely to penetrate the borders of France,
virtually unnoticed and unopposed.
Obviously the media news black out in Portugal & Spain has paid dividends.

Here the Hungarian hussars enter Tarbes, just below the french
Pyrennes where they surprised the French 1er regiment de hussards,
who had been enjoying quite garrison duties, until the Hungarians
showed up.

French report on the Hungarian Hussars entering Tarbes

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Report from the 1er regiment de hussards, regimental journal on
their encounter with the Hungarian hussars


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Hungarian Hussars enter Tarbes unopposed



Hungarian Hussars are popular with the ladies

. . . . .

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The French 1er regiment de hussards, are proud of their reputation for being
the Creme da la Creme and as can be seen from this video are equally
at home facing the British in full french Napoleonic uniform as they are in
facing more modern challenges. But as can be seen in this film, they forgot
to mount their horses after donning their Hussar uniforms.   ;)

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« Last Edit: 21:51 28-Oct-2012 by Lt. Campers »
The first in the field and the last from the Taverna.